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SNOWLINK MINUTE: ROCKER TECHNOLOGY FOR SKIS

Olympic Medalist and World Champion Nelson Carmichael gives the lowdown on rocker ski technology and how it works when you hit the snow. See how rocker tech makes it easier to get into a turn, and makes your skis more versatile overall.


rocker variables

Rocker, though it's been around for hundreds of years, reinvented itself within the last ten. Don't know what it is? In its extreme, picture a rocking chair rail. When you set a full-rocker (aka: reverse camber) ski on the snow without putting weight on it, its tip and tail turn up and its very middle sits flat. On the opposite end of the spectrum, a traditional camber ski touches the ground near the tip and tail while arcing away from the snow in between (when it's unweighted).

But rocker comes in different blends. Most commonly:
  • Camber underfoot with a rockered tip
  • Camber underfoot with rockered tip and tail
  • Flat (or "zero camber") underfoot with rockered tip and tail.
The camber underfoot allows for an easier time carving on hardpack, while the rocker makes it easier to ski powder and crud (skied-up powder), thanks to improved flotation, shock absorption and maneuverability.

The more rocker a ski has, the more powder specific it is. But manufacturers also find that a touch of rocker in the tip makes a ski easier to pivot on groomed snow, which is especially good for skiers who are still learning to set an edge and carve.

Regardless of the type, rockered skis are easier to ski as they shorten the ski's snow contact edge. So many people can ski a slightly longer rockered ski than they normally would a traditional camber ski.


1. Traditional Camber

The classic. For rebound, energy, and full-length edge pressure. Not dead yet.

3. Flat with Tip Rocker

Eases edge-to-edge transitions. Improves float. More responsive than full reverse camber.

5. Flat with Tip Rocker and Tail Rocker

Floaty. Smear-and-butter-friendly. More common in park and pow skis.

2. Camber with Tip Rocker

Improves float, reduces tip catch. Camber helps on hardpack. Now showing up in new frontside skis.

4. Camber with Tip and Tail Rocker

Camber for hardpack. Rocker for freshies. Improves versatility of powder skis.

6. Full Rocker or Reverse Camber

Nimble maneuvering in the megadeep. Helps with pivoting turns. May struggle on firm snow.

 

Rocker Technology

 

SNOWLINK MINUTE: ROCKER TECHNOLOGY FOR SKIS

Olympic Medalist and World Champion Nelson Carmichael gives the lowdown on rocker ski technology and how it works when you hit the snow. See how rocker tech makes it easier to get into a turn, and makes your skis more versatile overall.


rocker variables

Rocker, though it's been around for hundreds of years, reinvented itself within the last ten. Don't know what it is? In its extreme, picture a rocking chair rail. When you set a full-rocker (aka: reverse camber) ski on the snow without putting weight on it, its tip and tail turn up and its very middle sits flat. On the opposite end of the spectrum, a traditional camber ski touches the ground near the tip and tail while arcing away from the snow in between (when it's unweighted).

But rocker comes in different blends. Most commonly:
  • Camber underfoot with a rockered tip
  • Camber underfoot with rockered tip and tail
  • Flat (or "zero camber") underfoot with rockered tip and tail.
The camber underfoot allows for an easier time carving on hardpack, while the rocker makes it easier to ski powder and crud (skied-up powder), thanks to improved flotation, shock absorption and maneuverability.

The more rocker a ski has, the more powder specific it is. But manufacturers also find that a touch of rocker in the tip makes a ski easier to pivot on groomed snow, which is especially good for skiers who are still learning to set an edge and carve.

Regardless of the type, rockered skis are easier to ski as they shorten the ski's snow contact edge. So many people can ski a slightly longer rockered ski than they normally would a traditional camber ski.


1. Traditional Camber

The classic. For rebound, energy, and full-length edge pressure. Not dead yet.

3. Flat with Tip Rocker

Eases edge-to-edge transitions. Improves float. More responsive than full reverse camber.

5. Flat with Tip Rocker and Tail Rocker

Floaty. Smear-and-butter-friendly. More common in park and pow skis.

2. Camber with Tip Rocker

Improves float, reduces tip catch. Camber helps on hardpack. Now showing up in new frontside skis.

4. Camber with Tip and Tail Rocker

Camber for hardpack. Rocker for freshies. Improves versatility of powder skis.

6. Full Rocker or Reverse Camber

Nimble maneuvering in the megadeep. Helps with pivoting turns. May struggle on firm snow.

 

Rocker Technology